Sproutarians

Discussion Forums

Post Reply
Forum Home > General Discussion > Let's discuss hemp seeds

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

In America, the only edible hemp seeds are shelled.  The marijuana seeds that are legal in some states are super expensive, so they cannot be used as a food source. The whole hemp seeds I buy by the pound from China to use in a laxative medicine for my clients won't sprout.

SO basically, hemp seeds for eating are not sproutable, but they are still worth discussing on this forum because they are a good protein source. Plus they can make a good salad dressing for people's sprout salads.

I want to share hemp seed nutrition information and what ideas people have to balance the amino acid ratio with other seeds or foods to make a more complete protein. 

The first thing I want to share is that I used to be impressed by the 15g hemp protein powder by Nutiva.  Out of 30 g of powder, 15g is pure protein. IN order to achieve that ratio, they have to remove some fiber. It is a low fat powder.  In that process, iron is concentrated, which is nice for some iron deficient people.   THe problem with that powder is that even with some fiber removed, it's still a bit gritty and not pleasant to consume. It doesn't taste bad, but it's not something anyone would call delicious or would look forward to eating. 

Recently, I have  been using whole hemp seeds daily to make either salad dressing or hemp seed milk for fruit salads.  Using whole hemp seeds can be delicious and it feels wholesome.  SHelled hempseeds are 33% protein and when I compare my usage of the whole hemp seeds vs. hemp seed protein powder, hands down I will use the hemp seeds over protein powder.  I do understand people who need protein smoothies for more protein, but if you don't need extra protein, hemp seeds are so much more enjoyable to consume.

Lastly, shelled hemp seeds are white and protein powder is brown, so how do they make hemp protein powder? My guess is that they use the whole seed and don't shell it.  Otherwise how would the initial powder be so gritty before they remove some fiber?  So, shelled hemp seeds have to be a much finer product than hemp protein, except if one really needs that extra protein and iron.


--


April 12, 2016 at 3:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

JTP
Member
Posts: 234

I love hemp seeds... they are a staple in my diet. I use about 3/4 cup when making my garlic-hemp-curcumin salad dressing.


Hemp seeds are a fantastic source of omega-3's, magnesium, zinc, and highly bio-available protein. About 65% of hemp protein is edestin, a globular protein primarily found in hemp seeds which also boosts immunity. Edestin protein is similar to the human body’s own globular proteins found in blood plasma. The remaining 35% of protein in hemp is albumin, another globular protein. Enzymes, antibodies, many hormones, hemoglobin, and fibrogin are made from globular proteins. Not only are hemp seeds abundant in ALA, but they also contain GLA, a rare omega-6 fatty acid which exerts powerful anti-inflammatory effects, and SDA, a short-chain omega-3 fatty acid which has much higher conversion rates to EPA than ALA.

April 15, 2016 at 4:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

JTP
Member
Posts: 234

I think a lot of raw vegans out there are NOT getting enough protein but are convinced that they are, particularly those are primarily fruit-based diets. The protein content is too low and the amino acid variety is scant. This can pave way for neurotransmitter imbalance and adrenal dysfunction.


Plant-based (non heme) iron should be had with vitamin C to significantly increase absorption. Combining lemon juice into my salad dressings and adding red bell peppers to salads should, in theory, aid in iron absorption. I also plan on taking spirulina with camu camu.


http://www.myojio.com/ojio-nutrition-essentials-spirulina-tablets-raw-organic-supplement-8-8-oz.html?___SID=U - Claims to "Contains more bio-chelated organic iron than any other whole-food meaning iron will easily be assimilated into the body". There is 64% RDA of iron in 6 grams.

April 15, 2016 at 4:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

EAbe1987
Member
Posts: 13

Well amino acid profile is quite a bit different from the macronutrient protein itself. Most plants have a large amino acid profile, but don't have a great deal of macronutrient protein. However, I am personally experiencing evidence that the macronutrient protein is not as important as it is hopped up to be, and my health began to skyrocket when I considerably decreased my protein content (less than 10 grams a day).


I think that it is important to understand that the validity of certain information is based on the context of what people want to achieve. While I will not disregard scientific studies as being valid sources of information on nutrition, I will say that the validity is based on a certain model of human potential. The model of standard material biology is based on the operations of human beings who's lifespan averages to being between 70-80 years long. So if you want to be a human who has a relatively healthy individual who will clock out at 70-80 years, then this information is a valid source of knowledge for that personal goal.


However, for a person like me who is looking to achieve longevity that is far beyond that limit, this information MAY not really be that useful. Since modern material science doesn't invest any honest exploration in the area of things like biocosmic energy, spiritual-material interface, and those subjects that enter the realm of super-centenarian achievement, then there is only so far this information can apply, if it does indeed apply at all. Hell, with the supposed super-centenarians, most of them ate a diet that couldn't possibly satisfy the requirements that are highlighted in modern biology. But they conserved a vast amount of their energy by eating simple, whole foods that went through little to no processing. So based on what a person's goal is, that determines whether or not a way of interacting is a valid course of action.


I think that it also goes to note that while people focus on nutrients themselves, I feel the real focus is on FUNCTION of nutrients. The usefulness of protein is based on the function that it provides to the body, without that function it is completely useless. WIth that understanding, we have to understand that a nutrient like protein does not hold exclusivity to the function it provides. It is just the most readily known and readily focused on nutrient that provides the functions it provides. 


So while we worry about protein, it's more about the function that protein provides. There are probably several plants with constituents that are rather unknown to or ignored by modern material science. Just think of the history in many parts of the world with the thousands of medicinal herbs that are utilized for a variety of issues. Many of these herbs possess nutrients that fit neither into the category of the highlighted macronutrients or micronutrients that are highlighted in modern biology. Yet, many of them demonstrate an effectiveness that cannot be mimicked my any of these nutrients. 


I just point this out because I feel that people get way too complicated with their food. I know I have, and it was terribly detrimental for my mental and physical health. Hemp seed protein is brown primarily because it extracts on a certain part of the hemp, which would likely account for the color. I have had protein powders that are nearly fat-free, which means that there is obviously something that is left out. It was also high in fiber, like something in the realm of 36% of the daily recommended fiber intake. So that alone can account for the color, but honestly I don't really know why it is brown. Is it really important... not to me. If it works better than anything else I know, then it is a valid item.


I haven't really used hemp that much because it is not sproutable, or I should say that the supplied seeds are not sproutable. Add the monetary load it can have, and I would opt for something else that is more sustainable. I also practice urine therapy, which again is another science that really calls for a reassessment of information validity because that practice introduces factors that make some things more relevant, and others less relevant. Balancing is probably only an issue if you are making things too complicated. If they don't agree with your stomach, it's probably a better idea to just not eat them than to try a force them to "work" using through balancing acts. It costs more money, time, and in my experience rarely works in the long-term.


If you are already eating a decent amount of sprouted seeds like sunflower, sesame, and chia, I don't think it would add too much to what you are doing aside from taste with salad dressings. That's a good enough reason to add them, and they probably won't hurt you if they agree with the stomach. But in terms of health success... hell, life success period, simplicity is the absolute king. Don't overconsume them, soak'em, and then do with them as you please. Everything else is just... stuff lol.

April 17, 2016 at 6:43 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

JTP, I always wondered how you could stomach 3/4 cup of hemp seeds a day, but when I added more dates when I made my hemp seed milk (plus a vanilla bean), then I found hemp seeds not only palatable but easy on the stomach.  Normally I don't like too many dates a day (maybe 4-6 max in a smoothie), but when I make hemp milk, I add about 10-12.  Granted, a few people share the hemp milk, but the sweetness is very mild, because hemp seeds are subtlely bitter. When I make my salad dressing, I add lemon and orange juice, but I do find that more lemon juice controls more bitter things like raw sesame and hemp.

One thing I will add is that by adding more dates and vanilla to hemp seed, it rivals cashew milk in flavor, which is nice to more gourmet taste buds. 

I totally agree with you JTP that many vegans, both raw and cooked are not likely getting in enough protein, but especially rawists.  Look at the vegan weightlifter Patrick Baboumian and see his diet. He makes a point to combine foods to maximize proper amino acid ratios and so he emphasizes protein rich foods. It's working for him, because of his world record in yoke lifting.  I once met a middle aged woman with hair down to her feet and I asked her what her diet was and she did a ton of supplements and sushi daily.  As a vegan, I never could eat fish, much less raw fish, so I could not follow her example or take her advice.  I am not going to pretend that she didn't have a superior protein intake to me, but the inspiring journey of the vegan is to find vegan protein that comes close or rivals the meat eater.  I noticed that when I did some dairy products years ago, my hair was a lot thicker than as a vegan, but there is no way that I want to be anything but a vegan.  When I saw Brian Clement in person and I saw his amazing thick hair, I knew that being vegan didn't mean that one's hair had to be inferior to a meat eater.  He said that he takes silica daily (biosil) for that, though.  But still, his green drinks are probably totally assimilable protein.

Hi EAbe, there are two kinds of hemp protein powder on the market. THe unrefined kind is full of fiber, but the de-fibered kind is 50% pure protein. There is still some fiber, but less.  My thought is that they just press the whole seed to make hemp oil (shell and all) and then they powder the remains to make hemp protein.  But I could be wrong. 

Hemp seeds are definitely not for everyone, because of the expense.   

You are right about herbs, EAbe. I am an herbalist and science is far behind the holistic understanding of herbalism, especially Chinese herbalism. 

Careful about the urine therapy, please.  My one raw vegan friend had his hair analyzed and they found high levels of uranium.  I found that the body detoxes uranium through the urine and by consuming his urine, he wasn't doing himself any favors.  I think mining caused uranium to go into the drinking water and many people are exposed to that.  It was only after this revelation that 1) he stopped the urine therapy 2) he started drinking distilled water.  NOt to mention that my friend is still toxic after decades of being around chemicals in his hardware career.  It didn't matter that he drank green juice for 20 years. He still carried major toxins.  The toxins come out through all his skin pores via a toxic scent and texture.  It's more obvious to me than an average person who is used to toxicity.  Anyway, for him, it was way better for ALL of his elimination channels to be eliminating toxins as fast as possible, especially the main ones (bladder and colon), even though he still needs additional detoxification help.

Anyway, EAbe, your points are well taken. The main reason that Lou Corona doesn't eat hemp is because it doesn't sprout.  But when I try to eat like him (almond coconut yogurt) I find the food is too rich in fat for my constitution. 

The bottom line with shelled hemp is that it's one of the healthiest fast foods, even though it's not the absolute best.  

--


April 18, 2016 at 2:55 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

By the way, in no way did I mean to endorse animal foods in my last post.  Though some people seem to do well on sushi, others get horrible infections.  Some people seem to derive strength from dairy, while others get horribly congested and sick or get hormone imbalances (from milk products).    39% of people will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their life and a vegan diet is the best diet to heal the body, so why not start now? 

http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/what-is-cancer/statistics


--


April 18, 2016 at 11:08 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

Does anyone know where the enzyme inhibitors are located in a hemp seed?  Are they in the shell or partly in the fatty kernel? Once shelled, how much if any, enzyme inhibitors are left in the fatty part? 

I read that hemp seeds don't have phytic acid, so how necessary is it to soak shelled hemp seeds?

--


April 20, 2016 at 12:41 AM Flag Quote & Reply

JTP
Member
Posts: 234

The bottom line with shelled hemp is that it's one of the healthiest fast foods, even though it's not the absolute best.


Why do you say it's not the absolute best, because it can't be sprouted? Sure, I'd take sprouted hemp over non-sprouted hemp any day... but I think hemp is very low in anti-nutrients as is. It'd just be a raw food compared to a living food. You could argue that hemp seeds are the most nutritious seeds of all given their mineral content, amino acid profile, and fatty acids. Three tablespoons of hemp seeds provides roughly 50% RDA magnesium. 20% RDA iron, and 20% RDA zinc.

April 20, 2016 at 1:47 PM Flag Quote & Reply

You must login to post.