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JTP
Member
Posts: 234

I've been asking a lot of questions regarding lentil sprouts lately because I plan on making them a staple of my diet and I want to perfect how to grow them... but I need help.


-What length should the tails be when they are ready to be eaten?

-How do I ensure there is enough ventilation to avoid the tails from browning (rotting)? I used one cup (dry) of lentils in a 1/2 gallon jar a few times, watering 2x daily, and each batch started to rot. One cup seems to turn into roughly 8 cups when sprouted so I think these would be great for sprout salads.

-What does sprouting do to the calorie content of lentils?

-How many chia seeds do you sprout at once and do you still use the method of putting them on an organic cloth, spraying them daily, and then scraping them off?

March 30, 2016 at 3:28 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

it sounds like you used way too much water. I just cover my seeds with water.   As they absorb more and seem like they need more water to fully hydrate, I add a bit more water. I never let my seeds soak in water too longer because many pigments get washed away.  I just add enough water to facilitate the sprouting process but not enough water to make a tea (you don't want to make a cold tea, because you will be leeching nutrients that way. )

When you do it my way (not using too much water), the sprouts stay relatively dry, so there is no rotting, but just enough moisture to allow them to continue to grow. 

JTP, I had lentil sprouts in my refrigerator that were 1-2 months old and there was no moisture there and they were in this strange homeostasis of life.  They had not died and were still alive and had not molded or turned rotten. I gave them to my birds, because I wasn't sure if I wanted to eat them.  So, when you do it right, there is no mold or rotting.

I can't answer you about chia, but that's next on my to do list. Chia is not easy because it's so easy to overwater.

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March 30, 2016 at 8:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

JTP
Member
Posts: 234

The rotting doesn't happen until the third or fourth day so not sure if it's because of too much water. I soak for 6-8 hours and then water twice daily, in the morning and at night about 12 hours apart. After they bulk up from soaking, there usually isn't too much water left, maybe an inch or so above the lentils.

March 30, 2016 at 9:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

I don't rinse my lentils daily. I just add enough water to keep them continuing to sprout. Some people believe in thoroughly soaking their sprouts twice daily. I don't find that necessary with lentils. 

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March 30, 2016 at 10:11 PM Flag Quote & Reply

JTP
Member
Posts: 234

Please help! I even used 2/3 cup dry (lowered by 1/3 cup) in the 1/2 gallon jar and only watered once yesterday (twice daily up until this point though) and looking at them this morning they are starting to brown again. Do I need to put a fan near the dishrack or something for more circulation or only water once per day from the beginning?

April 23, 2016 at 9:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tai
Member
Posts: 53

Just as they are about to start to brown, you should refrigerate them, so they don't start to die. 

Look at how Annette Larkins legume sprouts continue to grow in the refrigerator.  She keeps a papertowel over the top of the jar and there is no moisture in the jar. 

I personally don't sprout lentils in jars. I sprout them in bowls and cover with a plate or flat sieve. 

I have been sprouting peruvian black corn in a bowl and I noticed they started to get either a tiny bit moldy or something was forming and so I transfered them into a huge sieve for better air circulation and rinsed them very lightly.  A day later, the stuff growing on them was totally gone and now they are sprouting.

Try different sizes and shapes of containers to sprout in.  Try sprouting in bowls and sieves.  See what works best.  Jars are just one option. 

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April 24, 2016 at 5:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Brian Nexus
Site Owner
Posts: 524

-What length should the tails be when they are ready to be eaten?

 

The rabbit ears of the lentil should just be starting to come out on the day when lentil sprouts are eaten. Why? Because the lectins are roughly reduced by 85% so they become much more digestable, and the sprout isn’t too bulky so lots can be eaten so the calories - nutrients - weight ratio isn’t lowered too much. See...we want to keep the sproutarian diet quite dense and not too bulky so it is more sustainable. If a diet gets too bulky it takes too long to eat and is too hard to get enough calories and nutrients.  It is important to live in the real world, and that is why l recommend juices and fermented sprouted seed pastes and sprouting various seeds to optimal levels whereby bulk is minimised relative to the anti-nutrient – nutrient levels where digestion is maximised. The sproutarian diet needs to be done in ways which things strike a fine balance otherwise digestion problems and trouble can occur. The sproutarian diet can become an artform. In time l will detail how to master the sproutarian diet.

 

-How do I ensure there is enough ventilation to avoid the tails from browning (rotting)? I used one cup (dry) of lentils in a 1/2 gallon jar a few times, watering 2x daily, and each batch started to rot.

 

Get good seeds, don’t put so many seeds in a jar, maybe put the seeds in a sprouting tray. Lentil sprouts usually don’t rot very easily. Lentil sprout tails can turn brown, but it is not rot in my experience. Do the lentils smell bad when the tails are brown?

 

-What does sprouting do to the calorie content of lentils?

 

The sprouting is going to reduce the calorie content, so we need to be careful not to over sprout them because the calorie content will get too low as they become more of a grassy food and too bulky. We want to still keep a lentil meaty, but at the same time it needs to be digestable.

 

Living on the raw sprouted grains and legumes is much more difficult than on the nuts and seeds, and some people may not be able to do it. In order to try to live on sprouted legumes and sprouted grains one must build their body up with lots of ferments and grow things to certain ideals. If one finds the eating of raw sprouted legumes and grains too hard l now recommend some cooking of these foods because it makes it much easier for most people. It is important to make a diet sustainable for people. Cooked food may negatively affect an animal, but that is not necessarily the case with a human...just look at all the long lived humans with good health who eat cooked food.

 

-How many chia seeds do you sprout at once and do you still use the method of putting them on an organic cloth, spraying them daily, and then scraping them off?

 

I sprout 12 heaping tablespoons of chia seeds. This meal fills me all day. That makes 5 trays that measure 12 inch by 16.5 inches. I then scrape them off and blend half in rejuvalic for 25 seconds and drink as a milkshake and then blend the other half later for 25 seconds. It is a good satisfying and filling meal. The rejuvalic adds taste so it is more creamy.

 

It is important to sprout the chia to make it more digestable, more tasty and reduce the gel bulk so one can get more food into them.  Trying to eat 12 tablespoons of soaked non sprouted seed would be too difficult and not pleasant, but not so when it is sprouted.

 

I am eating a lot of sprouted chia at the moment. See, it is also calorie and nutrient dense, and the rejuvalic makes it even more absorbable and nutritious.

 

The key to the sproutarian diet is to reduce the bulk and make it as calorie and nutrient dense as possible while increasing absorbability. There are many combinations of sproutarian diet that can be employed....some will do more seeds, some will do more grains and legumes, others will do some cooked.

 

Some will say that sprouted raw legumes and grains aren’t fit to eat, but everyone is different.  Annette Larkins seems to handle such foods with no problems, she has large jars of sprouted peas in her fridge. If one can’t handle many raw sprouted legumes and grains one may wish to build their body up with ferments and greens juices for 6 months and eat kelp and then see if they are able to handle sprouted legumes/grains better....it worked for me. If it still doesn’t work one may wish to  add some cooked food or fruit along with doing raw fermented sprouted seeds. See...lots of combinations can be done....i’ll detail this next year when l come back.  

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July 25, 2016 at 9:43 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Brian Nexus
Site Owner
Posts: 524

The rotting doesn't happen until the third or fourth day so not sure if it's because of too much water. I soak for 6-8 hours and then water twice daily,

 

An 8 hour soak is perfect for French green  lentils.

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July 25, 2016 at 9:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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